Published: March 2012

ID #: 66961

Journal: Public Health Rep

Authors: Polacsek M, O'Rourke K, O'Brien L, Blum JW, Donahue S

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In 2007, Maine became the first state to pass legislation limiting the marketing of foods of minimal nutritional value (FMNV) in public schools. This article describes compliance with this legislation and the nature and extent of junk food marketing in a representative statewide sample of high schools in Maine. Researchers found that posters and signs for unhealthy foods and beverages appeared in 85 percent of Maine high schools after the law took effect. An average of 12 instances of noncompliant marketing was found per school. In only 15 percent of schools, both administrators interviewed–the principal and food service director–reported knowing about the ban on marketing of unhealthy foods and beverages. Administrators in 80 percent of schools reported wanting more help to meet the law’s requirements.

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