Published: July 2012

ID #: CAS007

Publisher: Center for the Study of the Presidency and Congress, Health and Medicine Program

Authors: Center for the Study of the Presidency and Congress, Health and Medicine Program

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Given the coexistence of hunger and obesity in the United States, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) can play a critical role in addressing these public health problems. In April 2012, 46.2 million people were enrolled in SNAP, of whom nearly 50 percent are children. The reauthorization of the SNAP program presents an opportunity to explore strategies to improve the nutritional status of beneficiaries. This report summarizes an analysis that examined the feasibility of enhancing nutritional policies in SNAP and describes 10 key recommendations identified by the project team that, taken together, could help improve the nutritional health and prevent obesity among SNAP recipients.

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