Reducing Sugar-Sweetened Beverage Consumption by Providing Caloric Information: How Black Adolescents Alter Their Purchases and Whether the Effects Persist

This paper examines the ways in which adolescents altered the type and size of their purchases of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) in response to an intervention in six corner stores located in lower-income, predominately black neighborhoods in Baltimore, Maryland. Researchers used one of four randomly posted signs with caloric information about a 20 ounce SSB: 1) More

Lessons Learned from Small Store Programs to Increase Healthy Food Access

This paper presents the experiences and lessons learned from small food store interventions in four U.S. cities – Baltimore, Md.; Minneapolis, Minn.; Burlington, N.C.; and Philadelphia, Pa. Experiences from these four communities indicate that small store interventions face a variety of challenges that impact feasibility, acceptability, and long-term success. Particularly challenging issues included: understanding and More

Examining Contracts and Agreements Between Small-Scale Food Retailers and the Food Industry

Small retail food stores are ubiquitous in lower-income, urban settings, and are a major food source among lower-income racial and ethnic minority children and adolescents. Little is known about the types of agreements (e.g., slotting fees, retail promotional programs, exclusive contracts) that small retail food stores may have with manufacturers and distributors of high-sugar, high-fat More

Small Retailer Perspectives of the 2009 Women, Infants and Children Program Food Package Changes

In 2009, the U.S. Department of Agriculture implemented changes to the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) food package. This paper explores the perceptions of owners and managers of small food stores about implementation successes and challenges related to the new WIC package. Findings from qualitative interviews across seven states indicate More

Stocking Characteristics and Perceived Increases in Sales Among Small Food Store Managers/Owners Associated with the Introduction of New Food Products Approved by the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children

Implementation of the 2009 Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) food package has implications for WIC-authorized store managers/owners who had to modify their stock to meet the demands of their WIC customers and to maintain their WIC authorization. This paper examines perceived sales, product selection, and stocking habits of small WIC-authorized More

Healthier Home Food Preparation Methods and Youth and Caregiver Psychosocial Factors are Associated with Lower BMI in African American Youth

This paper discusses the results of a study which examined the relationship between home food preparation and adolescent body mass index (BMI) in a sample of 240 African American adolescents and their caregivers in Baltimore, Md. Researchers found that meals prepared at home in African American households do not necessarily promote healthy BMI in youth. More

Reduction in Purchases of Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Among Low-Income, Black Adolescents After Exposure to Caloric Information

This paper examines the effect of an intervention to provide caloric information about sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) on the number of SSBs purchased by Black adolescents. The intervention randomly assigned urban corner stores in Baltimore City, Maryland to the following calorie information conditions which were posted on the beverage cases: 1) absolute caloric count, 2) percentage More

Simplifying Caloric Labeling on Sugar-Sweetened Beverages to Reduce Consumption of Excess Calories

Providing easily understandable caloric information may be a low-cost strategy for lowering overall caloric intake among groups at high risk for obesity, particularly Black and Hispanic adolescents ages 12 to 18. The aims of the study are to: 1) examine if providing caloric information on sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs) significantly reduces the frequency and volume of More

Healthy Food Purchasing Among African American Youth: Associations with Child Gender, Adult Caregiver Characteristics and the Home Food Environment

This article discusses how the home food environment and caregiver and youth characteristics are associated with healthy food purchasing among lower-income African-American youth. Researchers found that intentions to eat healthier, caregivers’ attitude towards healthy eating and more frequent food preparation by family members were each significantly associated with higher frequency of purchasing healthy foods among More