Published: August 2011

ID #: 1050

Journal: Am J Public Health

Authors: Patel AI, Hampton KE

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Children and adolescents are not consuming enough water. Since children spend most of their day in school and child care settings, ensuring that safe, potable water is available in these settings is essential. This article identifies challenges that limit access to drinking water, including deteriorating drinking water infrastructure, limited drinking water availability, insufficient federal meal program regulations, and increasing availability of competitive beverages. It also discusses opportunities to increase drinking water availability and consumption, such as improving the quality of tap water, implementing policies that promote free drinking water access and intake, educating students and families about the benefits of tap water, and reducing the marketing and sales of competitive beverages. Future research, policy efforts and funding needed in this area are also identified.

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